Delusions Of Salsa Gender.

6 Feb

The following references are from:

by Cordelia Fine ».

A book that debunks a lot of ‘science’ and ‘neuroscience’ around gender differences.

Part 1: ‘Half-Changed World,’ Half-Changed Minds, Chapter 1: We Think, Therefore You Are, Page 9:
“… gender identity can also be primed without the help of openly expressed stereotypes. Have you, for example, ever filled in a question on a form that looks something like this?

[] Male
[] Female

Even an innocently neutral question of this kind can prime gender. …”

Part 1: 'Half-Changed World,' Half-Changed Minds, Chapter 1: We Think, Therefore You Are, Page 9

Salsa gigolos are tested all the time on the dancefloor, starting from day 1, and one of the first things a salsa gigolo will hear is that “women learn salsa faster than men.” Perhaps a less gender-threatening way to put this is to say, “it’s easier for a man or woman to learn to follow than it is for a man or woman to learn to lead.”

Part 2: Neurosexism, Chapter 16: Unraveling Hardwiring, Pages 182-183:
“… The International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) is a nine-hour exam, taken by six-person teams sent from up to ninety-five countries … Between 1998 and 2008 no girls competed for Japan. But next door, seven girls competed for South Korea (which, by the way, ranks higher than Japan). A profoundly gifted young female mathematician in Slovakia has a five times greater chance of being included on the IMO team than her counterpart in the neighboring Czech Republic. (Again, Slovakia outperforms the Czech Republic. I say this not to be competitive, but merely to show that teams with more girls have not been scraping the bottom of the barrel.) The ratio of female members on IMO teams among the top 34 participating countries ranges from none at all, to 1 in 4 (in Serbia and Montenegro). This is not random fluctuation, but evidence of “socio-cultural, educational, or other environmental factors” at work. …”

Part 2: Neurosexism, Chapter 16: Unraveling Hardwiring, Pages 182-183

I’m sure somewhere in this salsa universe, a salsa instructor has taught a class where the roles were reversed; where salseras were the leaders, and salsa gigolos were the followers. Imagine an entire salsa world like this. Or a world where 50% of salseras were leaders and 50% of salsa gigolos were followers. Or a world where all salseras and all salsa gigolos could both lead and follow.

Part 3: Recycling Gender, Chapter 21: The Self-Socializing Child, Page 231:
“… Children’s views about gender differences reach “peak rigidity” between five and seven years of age. From then on, they increasingly understand that it is not only boys who like to be active, and make things and sometimes be nasty, and it is not only women who can be affectionate, cry, and clean and tidy the house. (The few children who don’t come around to this insight often go on to have very successful careers writing popular books based on rigid gender stereotypes.) But even as their growing cognitive flexibility enables them to consciously modify or even reject certain gender stereotypes, we can only presume that these stereotypical gender associations linger on, continuing to be reinforced by the patterns of a half-changed world. …”

Part 3: Recycling Gender, Chapter 21: The Self-Socializing Child, Page 231

The enlightened salsa gigolo may strive for gender neutrality in his everyday life, yet he turns to salsa to be in touch with his biased self, the child version of his self before he turned five or seven. A salsera, too, turns to salsa for escape, to a time when little girls were princesses, and when little boys were frogs that could be turned into princes.

Salsa Gigolometer 100

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